TwitterFacebook

 
When everyone has a home

Housing advice for Northern Ireland

Living in a caravan or mobile home

If you live in a caravan or a mobile home that is situated on a residential site you have certain rights which are protected by law. These rights will only apply if you live in the caravan as your main home and you’ve been living on the site for at least 12 months.  This law won’t protect you if your caravan is only for holidays or you live on a site that’s mainly meant for holiday usage.

Right to a tenancy agreement 

The law allows you to have a tenancy agreement which has to include

  • your name and address and the name and address of the site owner,
  • details of the pitch you’re renting,
  • the length of your agreement,
  • information on how you or the site owner can end the agreement

The tenancy agreement should also explain when the site fee can be changed,  when the site owner is allowed to enter your pitch, what you need to do to make sure the site is maintained and what repairs the site owner is responsible for.

Like any other tenancy agreement, the site owner can add other terms as long as these are reasonable and fair.  If you disagree with any of these terms, you have a right to go to County Court, but you’ll have to prove that you tried to negotiate with the site owner about them first.

Eviction from a residential caravan site

The site owner needs to get a court order to end the agreement.  The site owner can only apply for a court order if

  • you’ve broken the agreement and haven’t put things right even though the site owner has given you time to do this;
  • you’re not living in the caravan or mobile home as your main residence;
  • your caravan is in a bad condition and this is having a negative effect on the site.

The court should only issue an order to end the agreement if it is reasonable to do this.

Harassment and illegal eviction

If the site owner tries to evict you without going to court, you should report this to your local council.  You can also report the site owner if he or she is harassing you.  You are entitled to “peaceful enjoyment” of your pitch, but the site owner can enter the pitch

  • to carry out essential repairs or emergency works or
  • to deliver written messages, read meters or carry out repairs between 09.00 and 18.00

If the site owner wants to enter your pitch for any other reason, he or she will have to give you at least 14 days’ notice and explain why he or she wants to enter.