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When everyone has a home

Housing advice for Northern Ireland

Rent

You must pay rent to your landlord in return for living in the property. If you stop paying your rent, are late with a payment or do not pay in full, your landlord may begin eviction proceedings against you.

Renting a home from a private landlord or through an agent could be an option, but there are potential problems which you should be aware of before taking on a tenancy. Know your rights and responsibilities.

You have to pay rent to your landlord. When you’re offered a Housing Executive or housing association property you should be told how much the weekly rent is.

The law sets out who is legally responsible for rates. If you're responsible for paying rates you should try to pay these directly to Land & Property Services or make sure that your landlord is passing on your rates payments to Land & Property Services

Housing benefit is a social security benefit which helps people on low income with their housing costs. It can cover rent, rates and some service charges. There are different systems for working out housing benefit for social tenants, who rent from the Housing Executive or housing associations, and for private tenants, who rent from a private landlord or agent.

It can be tempting to stop paying rent if you feel the property you are renting is not up to standard or the landlord is not sticking to the tenancy agreement. This is a risky procedure as your landlord may try to evict you if you stop paying rent.

Your responsibilities are set out in your tenancy agreement and tenant handbook. There are certain things you must do. If you don’t, your housing association could take steps to end your tenancy.

You may be able to challenge or appeal a housing benefit decision if you think it is wrong or unfair. This can be a complicated process so it's best to get help from an advice agency.

As a tenant you pay rent to your landlord in return for living in your home. In certain circumstances it is possible for landlords to increase the rent. This section explains when and how rent can be increased and what you can do if you disagree with the rent increase.

You have to pay rent to your landlord, whether that’s the Housing Executive, a housing association or a private landlord. When you’re offered a property you should be told how much the rent is and how much your rates and service charges are. If you're not given this information, make sure you ask for it before agreeing to take on a property.

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